Cold war remaints of Togliatti.

About 1000 km east of Moscow lies a city which could be best described as The Automotive Capital of Russia: Togliatti (Толятти).

Hosting not only one the largest automotive factories in the world, Togliatti is also home to a very unique museum: “The Technical Tuseum / Технический музей”. Due to it´s incredibly large collection of past-time military equipment, this place is a dream come true for any photographer equipped with more than just a tiny taste for industrial or history.

 

 

_DSC5042_p

 

_DSC5089_tonemapped

 


_DSC4700

 

 

 

_DSC4642

 

 

 

_DSC4645

 

 

_DSC9006

 

 

_DSC4910_1_2_tonemapped_ps_fb

 

 

_DSC8905

 

 

_DSC8999

 

 

_DSC5110

 

 

_DSC5125_6_7_tonemapped

 

_DSC5091_tonemapped_ps

 


 

All photos by Henrik Sundberg and Linda Fredling.

 

 

 

Share : twittergoogle plus
pinterest

Swedish post-industrial monument

Sulfite factory, Sweden.

The factory, once part of a major chemical business, was abandoned in the late seventies when globalization changed the market terms and rendered many previous investments obsolete.

_DSC6261

 

_DSC6270

 

_DSC6334

 

_DSC6333

 

_DSC6327

 

_DSC4405

 

 

_DSC4330

 

 

_DSC6215

 

_DSC5812

 

_DSC4288

 

_DSC5805

 

All images by Henrik Sundberg & Linda Fredling.
Equipment used: Sony A900, Sony A99, Minolta AF 17-35, Sigma 12-24, Minolta AF 50/1.4

 

Share : twittergoogle plus
pinterest

Psychiatric playground

_DSC4236

I recently had the pleasure of visiting a former mental hospital which was also used as a sanatorium for patients suffering from tuberculosis. These two areas of medical care have more in common than one would first expect due to the nature of the frequent tuberculosis outbreaks in the beginning of the 19th century. Quite often, the survivors who escaped the illness and the probable slow death often ended up being the last survivor of their families. Due to this, the suicide rates were very high in medical facilities caring for the survivors.

According to the prevailing method of treating tuberculosis at that time, the sanatoriums were often located in remote areas with fresh and dry air, often surrounded by forests. From a modern medical viewpoint, the main advantages of these installations were most likely the improved sanitary conditions rather than mountain air, compared to the surrounding villages and the inadequate hygiene that was common at that time.

_DSC2623

 

_DSC2612

 

_DSC2677

 

_DSC2682

 

_DSC2692

 

_DSC4404

 

_DSC4411

 

_DSC4418

 

_DSC4435

 

_DSC4449

 

_DSC2702

All images were captured by Henrik Sundberg and Linda Fredling. Equipment used: Sony A99 & Sony A900, Minolta AF 50/1.4, Minolta AF 17-35/2.8-4.5 & Sigma 12-24

Share : twittergoogle plus
pinterest